Specific to the interwar era, what arguments of the LGBT community still hold in the present? What if we took out Armageddon as a tangible factor?

A handful of fundamentalists spoke out against same-sex relationships. Barnhouse [Donald Grey] criticized what he interpreted as the celebration of same-sex relations in popular culture and lamented the rise and spread of "unnatural vice." He interpreted both as signs of the imminence of Armageddon. Journalist and evangelist Dan Gilbert called homosexuality "one of the ugliest blotches upon American civilization" and identified it as "one of the surest signs that the days of Noah are closing in upon us." Fretting that "well-financed and highly-organized cults of homosexuals sponsor all sorts of propaganda to woo and win new addicts to their horrible vice," he called on the public to "stamp out this plague in our midst." Moody professor Wilbur Smith called same-sex relations "another dreadful tendency of our times." It is the curse," he preached, "of all large penal institutions, of all concentration camps, internment areas, and great bodies of soldiers kept within military areas for long periods of time... Our Lord Himself said that Sodomic conditions would again be manifest before the coming of the Son of Man." Some fundamentalists even believed that the Antichrist would be gay, on the basis of Daniel 11:37, "neither shall shall he regard ... the desire of women." Although in the interwar era most fundamentalists did not acknowledge the existence of same-sex relations, the few who did viewed them as a menacing sign that confirmed the imminence of the Armageddon.

American Apocalypse, Mathew A. Sutton, Belknap Press, 2014, pg. 138-9